Op-Eds

  • November 30, 2009|Author: Amitav Acharya
    President Obama returned from a trip to Asia to attend the annual summit of Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) forum in Singapore on 13-15 November, and visit several other Asian capitals. Among his interlocutors in Asia were the leaders of two Asian nations which have staked a claim to global leadership. China is leading the charge, Japan is not far behind. India, a third contender,...
  • November 27, 2009|Author: Pitman B. Potter
    In anticipation of the forthcoming visit by Prime Minister Stephen Harper to China next month, I offer this open letter that I hope will be helpful in preparing the Prime Minister and informing broader communities of Canadians interested in strengthening Canada- China relations. November 27, 2009 Dear Prime Minister: As a long-time observer of developments on law and policy in China, I am...
  • November 12, 2009|Author: Alexandra Ho
    Ottawa's Asia Pacific Gateway and Corridor Initiative is developing according to plan and British Columbia has an opportunity to finally realize its own ambitious Asia Pacific vision. The $1-billion investment in infrastructure upgrades and expansion announced by the federal government in 2006 serves as a signal to both the Asia Pacific and other West Coast gateways that...
  • November 4, 2009|Author: Kenny Zhang
    A recent ground-breaking survey by the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada found that Canada is near the top of the list of overseas investment targets for Chinese companies. The „new China‟ is flexing its economic muscle and Chinese investors are prepared to buy their way into new markets and secure access to resources and technology. The question for this side of the Pacific is whether Canada is...
  • October 30, 2009|Author: Amitav Acharya
    Indonesia, the largest nation of Southeast Asia, the fourth most populous in the world, and the largest Muslim majority country, has received mostly bad reviews since the downfall of the Suharto regime in 1998. As economist Fauzi Ichsan of the Standard Chartered Bank in Jakarta remembers, “the betting was not whether Indonesia would fall apart -- breaking into half a dozen island states -- but...
  • September 21, 2009|Author: Pitman B. Potter
    Recent events in Xinjiang, falling roughly a year after similar unrest in Tibet, suggest that China’s policies toward its minority nationalities require substantial rethinking. The government’s claims that the unrest in Urumqi was fomented by outside agitators echo the position taken last year after protests by ethnic Tibetans, and ring just as hollow. Pointing the finger at external hostile...
  • August 5, 2009|Author: Wenran Jiang
    The growing outreach of Chinese national oil companies (NOCs) has stoked concerns that Beijing is manoeuvering to lock up global energy assets. Yet recent agreements with Russia, Kazakhstan, Brazil and Venezuela for a combined value of nearly US$50 billion in Chinese capital indicate oil-producing countries have maintained control of their assets. China has grown to become the world's second...
  • July 16, 2009|Author: Yuen Pau Woo
    The single biggest investment by a Chinese entity in a Canadian company was concluded on July 15 when China Investment Corporation (CIC) finalized its purchase of a $1.7-billion equity stake in Teck Resources of Vancouver. A few weeks earlier, the world’s largest bank — Industrial and Commercial Bank of China — established a presence in Canada with the acquisition of the Bank of East Asia (Canada...
  • July 14, 2009|Author: Don J. DeVoretz
    On April 17, 2009 an amendment to Canada’s citizenship act began the process of undermining Canada’s established generous twin principles for obtaining citizenship and created two classes of Canadians by removing citizenship ascension privileges for some children born to Canadians abroad. This is a fundamental and worrisome change. Major immigrant receiving countries (Australia, New Zealand,...
  • July 13, 2009|Author: Wenran Jiang
    For the past three decades, news stories about China have often reflected its rapid growth, its rising financial power and its status as a superpower in the making. But reports of ethnic tension and unrest in minority regions have raised serious questions about the country's stability, the distribution of its wealth and long-term relations between the Han majority and other groups. The violent...
  • June 23, 2009|Authors: Yuen Pau Woo, Wang Huiyao
    Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi's visit to Canada this week is a sign that recent Canadian overtures, including trips to China by Foreign Minister Lawrence Cannon and Trade Minister Stockwell Day, are bearing fruit. It is too early to declare that the period of “cool politics, warm economics” is over. But it is not too early to think about what a new phase of Canada-China...
  • June 10, 2009|Author: Pitman B. Potter
    On April 16, 1989, the day after the former Chinese Communist Party General Secretary Hu Yaobang died, a friend took me to the centre of Peking University, just beside the old bookstore, to read the big character posters, or dazibao. One particularly poignant posting mourned the death of ‘the last honest man’. As we walked among the somber groups of students and teachers, my friend mused – ‘...
  • April 15, 2009|Author: Pitman B. Potter
    Some 300 prominent Chinese intellectuals, officials and community leaders issued a document entitled “Charter 08” on the 60th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on December 10, 2008. Inspired by the Charter 77 associated with Vaclav Havel and others calling for political reform in Czechoslovakia in 1977, Charter 08 offers a framework for political and legal reform in...
  • February 25, 2009|Author: Yuen Pau Woo
    The global financial crisis has forced Canada to rethink the received wisdom about fiscal management. It should also force a rethink of the international economic order and how we must position ourselves for a post-crisis world. Can we count on our traditional ties with the U.S. to sustain long-term development? If the crisis marks a shift in economic power toward emerging countries, especially...
  • February 7, 2009|Author: Kenny Zhang
    China fully and carefully implemented the “Going Global” strategy in 2000 after almost two decades of testing the water of investing into the overseas markets, both as outward foreign direct investments (FDI) and the global portfolio investments. As always, Beijing intended to think its outward investment evolution as a long march like pursuing many other reform and open-door policies....
  • May 15, 2008|Author: Debra Steger
    Even as central banks around the world shore up financial institutions battered by the US sub-prime mortgage crisis, a debate has begun about the longer-term consequences of the crisis and what it means for the global financial system. One of the lesser known aspects of this debate is the role of Sovereign Wealth Funds (SWFs) in rescuing troubled banks, and the implications for foreign...
  • April 26, 2008|Author: Yuen Pau Woo
    Our economic relationship with the United States is in a state of comfortable discontent. Despite perennial ambivalence about American policies, we have taken solace in our superior access to the world’s richest economy. There is every reason to believe that America will continue to be our most important market for the foreseeable future. But this complacency has been shaken by the recent...
  • December 2, 2007|Authors: Yuen Pau Woo, Kenny Zhang
    The recent release of 2006 census data has reinforced Canada’s image as a nation of immigrants. Less well know, however, is the outmigration of Canadians, including recent immigrants who return to their native countries after obtaining Canadian status. Research by the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada suggests that there are perhaps 2.7 million Canadians abroad. As a share of the population,...
  • November 1, 2007|Authors: Paul Evans, David Chan
    Atlantic Canada has been debating the merits of an Atlantic Gateway strategy to boost container trade with Asia through the region’s ports. On October 14, the four Atlantic Provinces and the federal government finally signed a Memorandum of Understanding on the Atlantic Gateway that lays out a 24- month program to further study the opportunity, consult the private sector and develop an action...
  • October 6, 2007|Author: George Heller
    The Chinese manufacturing engine is showing stress factures as the days of easy money to be made by North American companies from outsourcing production are largely behind us. The spate of product recalls and health scares over toys, tires, toothpaste and pet food in the past few months are the warning signals. And while there is finger pointing at the Chinese Government and manufacturers for the...

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